Charlotte Selected to Join “What Works Cities” Initiative

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City Manager Ron Carlee announced that Charlotte has been selected as one of six new cities to participate in Bloomberg Philanthropies’ “What Work Cities” initiative – one of the largest-ever philanthropic efforts to enhance the use of data and evidence in the public sector. Launched in April 2015, the initiative is already providing support to 21 cities and will admit up to 100 cities on a rolling basis through 2017.

“As Charlotte continues to grow and expand, it’s more important than ever that we find new ways to use data and technology to our advantage,” said City Manager Ron Carlee. “By partnering with What Works Cities we can learn more about using data to improve our operations and further demonstrate our commitment to openness and transparency.”

Charlotte joins five other new cities in publicly committing to enhance their use of data and evidence to improve services, inform local decision-making and engage residents. Along with Boston, Massachusetts; Little Rock, Arkansas; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Raleigh, North Carolina, and Victorville, California, the City of Charlotte will receive support from world-class experts to address local issues.

What Works Cities collaborates with participating municipalities to review their current use of data and identify areas for improved government performance and efficacy. In partnership with What Works Cities, Charlotte will:

Improve open data practices in order to make the city’s data more accessible to city managers and the public, engage residents around priorities and services, and increase transparency and accountability.

Advance capacity to utilize performance management for strategy development, monitoring and reporting, and continuous improvement, allowing for deeper and more frequent analysis while building capacity and accountability among staff at all levels.

The consortium of leading organizations assembled by Bloomberg Philanthropies to provide a program of support includes Results for America; the Center for Government Excellence at Johns Hopkins University; the Government Performance Lab at the Harvard Kennedy School; Sunlight Foundation; and The Behavioral Insights Team.

With the addition of the new cities to the program, What Works Cities is now working in 27 cities in 18 states. The selected What Works Cities represent almost 11 million Americans, with annual budgets exceeding a combined $38 billion.

To receive updates on the What Works Cities initiative, please visit whatworkscities.org.

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